+1 631-218-8875

QRSI
Scholar Bios

QRSI
Scholar Bios

CBPR Scholars

Geni Eng, MPH, DrPH, is Professor of Health Behavior at the Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has over 30 years of CBPR experience including field studies conducted with rural communities of the U.S. South, Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia to address socially stigmatizing health problems such as pesticide poisoning, cancer, and STI/HIV.

Her CBPR projects include the NCI-funded Accountability for Cancer Care through Undoing Racism and Equity, the CDC-funded Men As Navigators for Health, the NCI-funded Cancer Care and Racial Equity Study, the NHLBI-funded CVD and the Black Church: Are We Our Brother’s Keeper? In addition to her co-edited book, Methods for Community-Based Participatory Research for Health, she has over 115 publications on the lay health advisor intervention model, the concepts of community competence and natural helping, and community assessment procedures. 

Alexandra Lightfoot, EdD, is Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Behavior at the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She also directs the Community Engagement, Partnerships and Technical Assistance (formerly CBPR) Core at UNC’s Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, a CDC-funded Prevention Research Center.

In this capacity, she promotes the use of CBPR and provides trainings, workshops and technical assistance to investigators and community partners to strengthened partnered research approaches. She is co-investigator on multiple studies that use the CBPR approach to address health disparities and advance health equity, including research collaborations with workshop co-presenters Eng, Schaal, and Jackson.

She is passionate about youth engagement and addressing racial inequities in health and education. Her current research focuses on the adaptation of adolescent sexual health interventions for new contexts. She has extensive experience using participatory arts-based approaches, including photovoice, to engage communities and inform intervention development and implementation.

Melvin Jackson, MSPH, has over 35 years of experience in community engagement, public health research and program coordination. He is a principal partner with The PRIME Collective, LLC, a group of community experts who consults and partners with investigators in how to incorporate principles of community engagement into all phases of research. The PRIME Collective also provides an avenue for addressing many of the barriers faced around community members engaging in academic research. Melvin Jackson is the founding community co-director of the Graduate Certificate in Participatory Research.

He also serves as Community Course Director for the Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars Program at the University of North Carolina, which provides two years of training, networking and skill-development in engaged scholarship to interdisciplinary faculty. Melvin Jackson is a Consultant to Community-Campus Partnerships for Health through its work on the RWJF Clinical Scholars Program.

He is also the Public Health Advocacy Coordinator/Local Improvement Advisor with the Alexander YMCA SCALE (Spreading Community Accelerators through Learning and Evaluation) with the Southeast Raleigh Promise Collaborative. The Collaborative is a part of the transformative redevelopment initiative, a community that will become a vibrant and vital link to elementary education, affordable housing, health and wellness, economic opportunity and leadership development in Southeast Raleigh.

Jennifer Schaal, M.D. completed her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Minnesota and practiced gynecology in a small private practice until she retired in 2006. While in practice she was a clinical investigator for the HERS (Heart and Estrogen-Progestin Replacement) and ERA (Estrogen Replacement and Atherosclerosis) studies and was on the Community Advisory Board of the Women’s Health Initiative.

Her committee work included service on the Moses Cone Hospital Institutional Review Board, Ob/Gyn Peer Review Committee, Pharmacy Committee and the Oncology Executive Committee.  Dr. Schaal is a founding member of the Greensboro Health Disparities Collaborative (GHDC), which was organized in 2002.  She served as co-chair of the GHDC for two years and as secretary for 5 years. She is a member of the board of directors for The Partnership Project, the fiscal agent for the GHDC.

As a medical-community member of the GHDC, she participated as an interviewer and Critical Incident Technique analyst for the GHDC’s CCARES (Cancer Care and Racial Equity Study).  She assisted in the planning, design, implementation and analysis of the “Respectful Prescribing” study, a pilot study for the Community Translational Science Award Grant Application by the UNC Center for Community and Clinical Research. She has been an active participant in the development and implementation of the GHDC’s Health Equity Training.  For the GHDC’s recently completed NCI-funded Accountability for Cancer Care through Undoing Racism and Equity (ACCURE) study she was the community co-lead for analysis and interpretation of focus group data; participated in development and presentations of Healthcare Equity Education & Training; and training and supervising telephone interviewers for ACCURE.

With Dr. Eng and other academic and community partners she has delivered keynotes for University of New Mexico, University of Michigan, and Asia Institute in Cambodia; co-presented scientific presentations at APHA in 2008, 2014, 2016, 2017; co-authored multiple peer-reviewed publications and book chapters; and served as Community Expert for CBPR Charrettes and co-trainer for multiple 2-day CBPR workshops.  In addition, she has served on multiple research advisory boards and has been a community partner with other investigators on CBPR projects.  She is active with the Guilford Anti-Racism Alliance and is currently a trainer for the Racial Equity Institute based in Greensboro, NC.

CBPR

Geni Eng, MPH, DrPH, is Professor of Health Behavior at the Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has over 30 years of CBPR experience including field studies conducted with rural communities of the U.S. South, Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia to address socially stigmatizing health problems such as pesticide poisoning, cancer, and STI/HIV.

Her CBPR projects include the NCI-funded Accountability for Cancer Care through Undoing Racism and Equity, the CDC-funded Men As Navigators for Health, the NCI-funded Cancer Care and Racial Equity Study, the NHLBI-funded CVD and the Black Church: Are We Our Brother’s Keeper? In addition to her co-edited book, Methods for Community-Based Participatory Research for Health, she has over 115 publications on the lay health advisor intervention model, the concepts of community competence and natural helping, and community assessment procedures. 

Melvin Jackson, MSPH, has over 35 years of experience in community engagement, public health research and program coordination. He is a principal partner with The PRIME Collective, LLC, a group of community experts who consults and partners with investigators in how to incorporate principles of community engagement into all phases of research. The PRIME Collective also provides an avenue for addressing many of the barriers faced around community members engaging in academic research. Melvin Jackson is the founding community co-director of the Graduate Certificate in Participatory Research.

He also serves as Community Course Director for the Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars Program at the University of North Carolina, which provides two years of training, networking and skill-development in engaged scholarship to interdisciplinary faculty. Melvin Jackson is a Consultant to Community-Campus Partnerships for Health through its work on the RWJF Clinical Scholars Program.

He is also the Public Health Advocacy Coordinator/Local Improvement Advisor with the Alexander YMCA SCALE (Spreading Community Accelerators through Learning and Evaluation) with the Southeast Raleigh Promise Collaborative. The Collaborative is a part of the transformative redevelopment initiative, a community that will become a vibrant and vital link to elementary education, affordable housing, health and wellness, economic opportunity and leadership development in Southeast Raleigh.

Alexandra Lightfoot, EdD, is Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Behavior at the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She also directs the Community Engagement, Partnerships and Technical Assistance (formerly CBPR) Core at UNC’s Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, a CDC-funded Prevention Research Center.

In this capacity, she promotes the use of CBPR and provides trainings, workshops and technical assistance to investigators and community partners to strengthened partnered research approaches. She is co-investigator on multiple studies that use the CBPR approach to address health disparities and advance health equity, including research collaborations with workshop co-presenters Eng, Schaal, and Jackson.

She is passionate about youth engagement and addressing racial inequities in health and education. Her current research focuses on the adaptation of adolescent sexual health interventions for new contexts. She has extensive experience using participatory arts-based approaches, including photovoice, to engage communities and inform intervention development and implementation.

Jennifer Schaal, M.D. completed her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Minnesota and practiced gynecology in a small private practice until she retired in 2006. While in practice she was a clinical investigator for the HERS (Heart and Estrogen-Progestin Replacement) and ERA (Estrogen Replacement and Atherosclerosis) studies and was on the Community Advisory Board of the Women’s Health Initiative.

Her committee work included service on the Moses Cone Hospital Institutional Review Board, Ob/Gyn Peer Review Committee, Pharmacy Committee and the Oncology Executive Committee.  Dr. Schaal is a founding member of the Greensboro Health Disparities Collaborative (GHDC), which was organized in 2002.  She served as co-chair of the GHDC for two years and as secretary for 5 years. She is a member of the board of directors for The Partnership Project, the fiscal agent for the GHDC.

As a medical-community member of the GHDC, she participated as an interviewer and Critical Incident Technique analyst for the GHDC’s CCARES (Cancer Care and Racial Equity Study).  She assisted in the planning, design, implementation and analysis of the “Respectful Prescribing” study, a pilot study for the Community Translational Science Award Grant Application by the UNC Center for Community and Clinical Research. She has been an active participant in the development and implementation of the GHDC’s Health Equity Training.  For the GHDC’s recently completed NCI-funded Accountability for Cancer Care through Undoing Racism and Equity (ACCURE) study she was the community co-lead for analysis and interpretation of focus group data; participated in development and presentations of Healthcare Equity Education & Training; and training and supervising telephone interviewers for ACCURE.

With Dr. Eng and other academic and community partners she has delivered keynotes for University of New Mexico, University of Michigan, and Asia Institute in Cambodia; co-presented scientific presentations at APHA in 2008, 2014, 2016, 2017; co-authored multiple peer-reviewed publications and book chapters; and served as Community Expert for CBPR Charrettes and co-trainer for multiple 2-day CBPR workshops.  In addition, she has served on multiple research advisory boards and has been a community partner with other investigators on CBPR projects.  She is active with the Guilford Anti-Racism Alliance and is currently a trainer for the Racial Equity Institute based in Greensboro, NC.

Dr. Tony Adams is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication, Media and Theatre at Northeastern Illinois University. He teaches courses about interpersonal and family communication, qualitative research, communication theory, and sex, gender, and sexuality.

He is the author of more than 50 articles, book chapters, and reviews, and has published four books: Narrating the Closet: An Autoethnography of Same Sex Desire (Left Coast Press, 2011), The Handbook of Autoethnography (Left Coast Press, 2013, co-edited with Carolyn Ellis and Stacy Holman Jones), On (Writing) Families: Autoethnographies of Presence and Absence, Love and Loss (Sense Publishers, 2014, co-edited with Jonathan Wyatt), and Autoethnography (Oxford University Press, 2015, co-authored with Carolyn Ellis and Stacy Holman Jones). He is currently working on four additional books: one about queer autoethnography, another about Teaching Sexuality, and a third about the ethics in qualitative research.

Arthur P. Bochner is distinguished university professor of communication at the University of South Florida and a distinguished scholar of the National Communication Association. He has established an international and interdisciplinary reputation for his theoretical, critical, and empirical contributions to the study of narrative and autoethnographic inquiry including narrative identity, narrative truth, illness narratives, and memory work.

An originator and developer of reflexive social science methodologies that bring emotions, subjectivity, and storytelling into research in the social sciences, his highly influential monographs and books have introduced new concepts such as institutional (organizational) depression, vulnerable medicine, relational dialectics, and genre bending forms of representing lived experiences that have helped shape the work of three generations of communication researchers. Currently, he teaches the only course with love in its title offered at the University of South Florida.

Dr. Bochner has published more than 100 monographs, articles, and book chapters as well as three books, two edited volumes and four special issues of academic journals. Co-editor of three book series, he has presented keynote lectures and workshops across the globe. His 2014 book, Coming to Narrative: A Personal History of Paradigm Change in the Human Sciences, received the best book award from The International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry and the Ethnography Division of the National Communication Association.

Among his other numerous awards are the Charles H. Woolbert Research Award from NCA’s Ethnography Division, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Center for Qualitative Inquiry, Ohio University’s Elizabeth Andersch Award for career contributions, and two NCA awards, Bernard J. Brommel Award for distinguished contributions to family communication and the Samuel L. Becker Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Bochner’s most recent book is Evocative Autoethnography: Writing Lives and Telling Stories (Routledge, 2016) with Carolyn Ellis.

Kathy Charmaz is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Faculty Writing Program at Sonoma State University. In the latter position, she leads seminars for faculty to help them complete their research and scholarly writing. She has written, co-authored, or co-edited fourteen books including two award-winning books, Constructing Grounded Theory: A Practical Guide Through Qualitative Analysis and Good Days, Bad Days: The Self in Chronic Illness and Time. The considerably expanded second edition of Constructing Grounded Theory recently appeared as did a co-edited Sage Publications four-volume set, Grounded Theory and Situational Analysis with senior editor, Adele Clarke. Her co-edited volume with senior editor Antony Bryant, The Sage Handbook of Grounded Theory, appeared in 2007.

Professor Charmaz is a co-author of two multi-authored methodology books, Five Ways of Doing Qualitative Analysis: Phenomenological Psychology, Grounded Theory, Discourse Analysis, Narrative Research, and Intuitive Inquiry, which came out in 2011 with Guilford, and Developing Grounded Theory: The Second Generation, a 2009 publication with Left Coast Press. She has also published numerous articles and chapters on the experience of chronic illness, the social psychology of suffering, writing for publication, and grounded theory and qualitative research.

Professor Charmaz has served as President of the Pacific Sociological Association, President and Vice-President of the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction, Vice-President of Alpha Kappa Delta, the international honorary for sociology, editor of Symbolic Interaction, and Chair of the Medical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association. She has received the Feminist Mentors Award and the George Herbert Mead award for lifetime achievement from the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction. She lectures and leads workshops on grounded theory, qualitative methods, medical sociology, and symbolic interactionism around the globe.

Carolyn Ellis is distinguished university professor of communication and sociology at the University of South Florida (USF). She has established an international reputation for her contributions to the narrative study of human life. Having published extensively in qualitative methods, storytelling, emotions, and loss and trauma, she integrates ethnographic, literary, and evocative writing in short stories, research articles, and documentaries to portray and make sense of lived experience in cultural context.

She is best known as an originator and developer of autoethnography, a reflexive approach to research, writing, and storytelling that connects the autobiographical and personal to the cultural, social, and political. Seeking to do research that has the possibility of improving human lives and enhancing social justice, she currently is engaged with Holocaust survivors in collaborative and compassionate interviews guided by a relational ethics of care.

Dr. Ellis has published five monographs, six edited books, and more than 150 articles, chapters, and review essays. She has edited two book series and presented keynote addresses and workshops in sixteen countries. Her most recent book is Evocative Autoethnography: Writing Lives and Telling Stories (with Arthur Bochner).

Her numerous national and international lifetime career, scholarly, mentoring and book and article awards include the Charles H. Woolbert Research Award and the Distinguished Scholar Award, both from the National Communication Association (NCA), The Legacy Lifetime Award and best book and article awards from NCA’s Ethnography Division, a Lifetime Achievement Award in Qualitative Inquiry and a best book award from the International Center for Qualitative Inquiry at the University of Illinois, and numerous research, teaching, and leadership awards from USF.

Alison B. Hamilton, Ph.D., M.P.H., a Research Anthropologist in the UCLA Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, received her Ph.D. in medical and psychological anthropology from UCLA in 2002, and her M.P.H. in Community Health Sciences from UCLA in 2009.

Dr. Hamilton is the Director of the VA-funded EMPOWER (Enhancing Mental and Physical Health of Women through Engagement and Retention) Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI), focused on improving women Veterans’ health and health care through implementation science. She is Associate Director for Implementation Science and Director of the Qualitative Methods Group at the VA Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation and Policy, specializing in women Veterans’ health, mental health services research, and implementation science. She was a fellow in the inaugural cohort of the NIMH/VA Implementation Research Institute and she serves on the editorial boards of Implementation Science and Women’s Health Issues.

Dr. Hamilton has been a consultant with ResearchTalk for over 19 years, providing direct support to clients as well as serving as faculty for several of the Qualitative Research Summer Intensives and mentor at ResearchTalk’s Qualitative Data Analysis and Data Collection Camps. At recent Intensives, she has taught courses on qualitative methods in implementation research, rapid qualitative research methods, qualitative grant-writing, qualitative interviewing, mixed methods research, and enhancing the usefulness of qualitative research. Dr. Hamilton is a co-author on Dr. Ray Maietta’s Sort and Sift, Think and Shift (forthcoming).

Sherick Hughes is an Associate Professor of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As the Founder/Director of the Interpretive Research Suite and Bruce A. Carter Qualitative Lab, and Founder/Co-Director of the Graduate Certificate in Qualitative Studies, his equity work focuses on: (a) Critical Race Studies & Black Education, (b) Social Context of Education and (c) Qualitative/Mixed Methodology in Education.

Hughes has numerous peer-reviewed publications, including two books selected for AESA Critics’ Choice awards (2007, 2014). He is the lead author of the new Sage textbook, Autoethnography: Process, Product & Possibility, and the 2016 recipient of an AERA Distinguished Scholar Award. Currently, he serves as a member of the AESA Executive Council.

George Kamberelis is an Associate Professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. He conducts research and scholarship on qualitative research methods and literacy learning and teaching in school and non-school settings. He is especially interested in the philosophical and theoretical foundations of qualitative inquiry and the quasi-unique affordances of focus groups in qualitative research studies. His theoretical and empirical work has appeared in journals such as Reading Research Quarterly, Research in the Teaching of English, Journal of Literacy Research, Linguistics and Education, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, and Qualitative Inquiry. Citations for publications especially relevant to the course he is teaching at the Qualitative Research Summer Institute are listed below:

  • Kamberelis, G., Dimitriadis, G., & Welker, A. (In press). Focus group research and/in figured worlds. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of qualitative research (5th ed., pp. xxx-xxx). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Kamberelis, G., & Dimitriadis, G. (2014). Focus groups: Retrospect and prospect. In The Oxford Handbook of Qualitative Research Methods (pp. 315-340). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Kamberelis, G., & Dimitriadis, G. (2013). Focus groups: From structured interviews to collective conversations. New York: Routledge.
  • Martin, A. D., & Kamberelis, G. (2013). Mapping not tracing: Qualitative educational research with political teeth. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 26(6), 668-679.
  • Kamberelis, G. (2013). Focus group research. In M. Savin-Baden & C. Major (Eds.). An Introduction to qualitative research (pp. 386-387). New York: Routledge.
  • Kamberelis, G., & Dimitriadis, G. (2011). Focus groups: Contingent articulations of pedagogy, politics, and inquiry. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of qualitative research (4th ed., pp. 545-561). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Kamberelis, G., & Dimitriadis, G. (2005). Focus groups: Strategic articulations of pedagogy, politics, and research practice. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of qualitative research (3rd ed., pp. 887-907). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Kamberelis, G., & Dimitriadis, G. (2005). On qualitative inquiry: Approaches to language and literacy research. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Kamberelis, G. (2003). Ingestion, elimination, sex, and song: Trickster as premodern avatar of postmodern research practice. Qualitative Inquiry, 9(5), 673-704.
Raymond C. Maietta, Ph.D. is president of ResearchTalk Inc., a qualitative research consulting company based in Long Island, New York and Cary, North Carolina. A Ph.D. sociologist from the State University of New York at Stony Brook, with postdoctoral training at Indiana University, Ray’s interests in the art of qualitative research methods motivated him to start ResearchTalk in 1996. ResearchTalk Inc. provides project consultation and co-analysis services on all phases of qualitative analysis to university, government, not-for-profit, and corporate researchers. More than 20 years of consultation with qualitative researchers informs Dr. Maietta’s publications and a current methods book he is writing:
  • “Systematic Procedures of Inquiry and Computer Data Analysis Software for Qualitative Research,” co-authored with John Creswell, in Handbook of Research Design and Social Measurement (Sage Publications, 2002)
  • “State of the Art: Integrating Software with Qualitative Analysis” in Applying Qualitative and Mixed Methods in Aging and Public Health Research, edited by Leslie Curry, Renee Shield, and Terrie Wetle (American Public Health Association and the Gerontological Society of America, 2006).
  • “The Use of Photography As a Qualitative Research Method” in Visualizing Social Science, edited by Judith Tanur (Social Science Research Council, 2008).
  • “Qualitative Software” in the Sage Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods, edited by Lisa Given (Sage Publications, 2008).
  • “Integrating Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis with MAXQDA” in Journal of Mixed Methods (Sage Publications, April 2008)
  • “The Symbolic Value and Limitations of Racial Concordance in Minority Research Engagement”, co-authored with Craig S. Fryer, Susan R. Passmore, et al., in Qualitative Health Research, March 13, 2015 (Sage Publications)
  • Sort and Sift, Think and Shift, (Guilford Press) in progress.
Ray’s work invites interactions with researchers from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. He is an active participant at conferences around the country including invited presentations at American Evaluation Association, American Anthropological Association, and American Sociological Association.

Paul Mihas is a senior social research associate specializing in qualitative research at the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In this role, he regularly advises graduate students and faculty on qualitative methods, software, and strategies for analysis. He is the former managing editor of Social Forces, a journal of sociology published at the University of North Carolina Press.

As a qualitative analysis consultant with ResearchTalk (since 2001), Mihas has lectured on qualitative methods and strategies for analysis at several universities, including the University of Puerto Rico, Howard University, and Temple University. He has also served as faculty at the annual Qualitative Research Summer Intensive and a mentor at ResearchTalk’s Qualitative Data Analysis Camps.

His interests include memo writing as a stand-alone method; his current research focuses on cancer survivors and metaphors for illness and the body. Mihas received an M.A. (1989) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Mihas is a co-author on Dr. Ray Maietta’s Sort and Sift, Think and Shift forthcoming publication.

George W. Noblit is the Joseph R. Neikirk Distinguished Professor of Sociology of Education in the School of Education at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he teaches advanced qualitative data analysis and interpretation and sociology of education.

His research is largely focused around studies of race and schooling. His research has won three awards from two associations. He is currently completing a new book on meta-ethnography (a qualitative research synthesis approach he developed) and social theory– his nineteenth book. He regularly conducts funded evaluation studies, and is currently doing fieldwork in Minnesota schools examining that state’s arts-integration efforts. He has published in a wide-range of journals and edits a journal and two book series.

Dr. Trena Paulus, Ph.D., is a Professor of Qualitative Research Methods at the University of Georgia. She is author of Digital Tools for Qualitative Research (2014, Sage) and Researching Learning, Insight and Transformation in Online Talk (2018, Routledge). Dr. Paulus has published over 50 peer-reviewed journal articles on topics related to qualitative research technologies, language-based methodologies for investigating online conversations, and online learning.

She is co-founder of the Digital Tools special interest group at the International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry and recently co-edited a special issue on the topic for Qualitative Inquiry. Dr. Paulus consults and provides workshops on the use of digital tools, discourse analysis, and online discussions in a variety of research contexts in the U.S. and internationally. She is a certified professional trainer for ATLAS.ti.

Cheryl Poth is a faculty member and award winning instructor in the Centre for Research and Applied Measurement and Evaluation in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. In this role, she has developed and teaches graduate courses in research methods and program evaluation. Dr. Poth has an adjunct appointment in the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry and serves as the methodologist on several cross-disciplinary research teams.

Her specific research interests include enhancing research quality and collaborative research teams in the fields of education and the health sciences. She is an advisory board member of the International Institute of Qualitative Methodology and fourth president of the Mixed Methods International Research Association. She currently serves as associate editor of the Journal of Mixed Methods Research and editorial board member of the International Journal of Qualitative Methodology and Canadian Journal of Program Evaluation. She has recently co-authored with John Creswell on the 4th edition of Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design (2017, Sage) which was recently awarded Sage’s Cornerstone Author award and is working on a Mixed Methods Research book with Sage publications (forthcoming in late 2018).

Johnny Saldaña is Professor Emeritus from Arizona State University’s (ASU) School of Film, Dance, and Theatre in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. He is the author of Longitudinal Qualitative Research: Analyzing Change through Time (2003, AltaMira), The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers (3rd ed., 2016, Sage), Fundamentals of Qualitative Research (2011, Oxford), Ethnotheatre: Research from Page to Stage (2011, Left Coast), Thinking Qualitatively: Methods of Mind (2015, Sage), co-author with the late Matthew B. Miles and A. Michael Huberman for Qualitative Data Analysis: A Methods Sourcebook (3rd ed., 2014, Sage), and the editor of Ethnodrama: An Anthology of Reality Theatre (2005, AltaMira).

His most recent book is Qualitative Research: Analyzing Life, a new methods textbook with co-author Matt Omasta (2018, Sage). Saldaña’s works have been cited and referenced in over 4,000 research studies conducted in over 120 countries, in disciplines such as K-12 and higher education, medicine and health care, technology and social media, business and economics, the fine arts, the social sciences, human development, and government and social services.

Saldaña’s research in qualitative inquiry, data analysis, and performance ethnography has received awards from the American Alliance for Theatre & Education, the National Communication Association–Ethnography Division, the American Educational Research Association’s Qualitative Research Special Interest Group, and the ASU Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. He has published a wide range of research articles in journals such as Research in Drama Education, Multicultural Perspectives, Youth Theatre Journal, Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, Teaching Theatre, Research Studies in Music Education, and Qualitative Inquiry, and has contributed several chapters to research methods handbooks.

Margarete Sandelowski is Boshamer Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing. She has directed and was principal faculty in the summer programs in qualitative and mixed methods research offered through the Center for Lifelong Learning at the School of Nursing. She has published widely in refereed nursing, interdisciplinary health, and social science journals (e.g., Field Methods, Journal of Mixed Methods Research, Qualitative Health Research, Research in Nursing and Health, Social Science and Medicine) and anthologies in the domains of gender and technology, and qualitative and mixed methods research (both primary research and research synthesis). Her works have been translated into Spanish and Japanese.

Among her books are Handbook for Synthesizing Qualitative Research (2007, Springer) and With Child in Mind: Studies of the Personal Encounter with Infertility (1993, University of Pennsylvania), which was awarded the 1994 Eileen Basker Memorial Prize from the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association.

Among her book chapters are:

  • “Synthesizing Qualitative and Quantitative Research Findings,” by M. Sandelowski, C.I. Voils, J. Crandell, and J. Leeman in Routledge International Handbook of Qualitative Nursing Research, edited by C.T. Beck (2013, Routledge)
  • “On Quantitizing,” by M. Sandelowski, C.I. Voils, and G. Knafl in Sage Quantitative Research Methods: Vol.1. Fundamental Issues in Quantitative Research, edited by W.P. Vogt (2011, Sage)
  • “Current Practices and Emerging Trends in Conducting Mixed-Methods Intervention Studies in the Health Sciences,” by M. Song, M. Sandelowski, and M.B. Happ in Sage Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social and Behavioral Research (2d ed.), edited by A. Tashakkori and C. Teddlie (2010, Sage)
  • “Writing the Proposal for a Qualitative Research Methodology Project,” by M. Sandelowski in Qualitative Research 2 (vol. 2), edited by A. Bryman (2007, Sage)
  • “Tables or Tableaux? Writing and Reading Mixed Methods Studies,” by M. Sandelowski in Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social and Behavioral Research, edited by A. Tashakkori and C. Teddlie (2003, Sage)

Dr. Sandelowski has been awarded as principal investigator four 5-year R01 grants from the National Institutes of Health in the qualitative and mixed methods research domains. She has served on NIH and other grant review panels, and contributed to the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research Working Group that resulted in the 2011 Best Practices for Mixed Methods Research in the Health Sciences. She was inducted in 2015 into the Sigma Theta Tau International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.

Mario L. Small, Ph.D., is Grafstein Family Professor in the Department of Sociology at Harvard University. Former Dean of the Social Sciences at the University of Chicago, Small has published numerous award-winning articles, edited volumes, and books on topics such as urban poverty, personal networks, and the relationship between qualitative and quantitative methods.

His books include Villa Victoria: The Transformation of Social Capital in a Boston Barrio (2004) and Unanticipated Gains: Origins of Network Inequality in Everyday Life (2009), both of which received the C. Wright Mills Award for Best Book, among several other honors. Small is currently studying the differences in the experience of ghetto poverty across American cities and is writing a book, Someone To Talk To, on how people decide whom to turn to when seeking a confidant.

Kevin Swartout is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology with a secondary appointment in the School Public Health at Georgia State University in Atlanta, GA. He earned his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. His research focuses on social influence of harassment and violence, as well as trajectories of violent behavior and victimization across the lifespan.

He has received early-career awards from the International Society for Research on Aggression, Southeastern Psychological Association, and Georgia State University. Dr. Swartout has published numerous peer-reviewed research articles and frequently speaks at national and international conferences. He has been a qualitative research consultant with ResearchTalk Inc. for ten years. In this capacity, he has regularly taught short courses on qualitative and mixed methods research as well as qualitative data analysis software. Dr. Swartout frequently serves as a scholar at ResearchTalk’s Qualitative Research Summer Intensive and as a mentor at ResearchTalk’s Qualitative Data Analysis Camps and he is also a co-author on Dr. Ray Maietta’s Sort and Sift, Think and Shift forthcoming publication.

Sally Thorne, RN, PhD, FAAN, FCAHS, DSc(Hon) is a Professor of Nursing and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science at the University of British Columbia, Canada where she has maintained a longstanding program of substantive research in the fields of chronic illness and cancer experience as well as scholarship in the fields of philosophy of science, including the epistemological basis of disciplinary knowledge development in the health fields, and the nature of evidence claims in a complex health policy environment.

She is the author of a body of applied qualitative methodological writing, including Interpretive Description (2008, Left Coast) and its second edition Interpretive Description: Qualitative Research for Applied Practice (2016, Routledge). She is an Associate Editor for the multidisciplinary journal Qualitative Health Research (Sage) and Editor-in-Chief for a journal that deals with critical scholarship in nursing and health care Nursing Inquiry (Wiley). A longstanding member of the Advisory Board for the International Institute of Qualitative Methodology, Thorne also serves on several other editorial boards and she consults and speaks on matters relating to qualitative methods nationally and internationally.  

Professor Thorne’s profile page, with research interests, publications and other information can be found here.

Dr. Sarah J. Tracy is Herberger Professor of organizational communication and qualitative methodology in the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University. She has led over 20 qualitative workshops in a number of international settings in which participants go beyond learning about methods to practicing specific qualitative crafts and analytic techniques. Sarah created the “eight big-tent criteria” model for excellent qualitative research and is author of Qualitative Research Methods: Collecting Evidence, Crafting Analysis, Communicating Impact (2013, Wiley-Blackwell), a YouTube channel called “Get Your Qual On,” and more than 65 monographs. She approaches research from a use-inspired standpoint and endeavors toward creating scholarship that inspires wisdom, compassion, transformation, and well-being.

Sarah’s PublicationsSarah’s BlogSarah’s Youtube

Mark D. Vagle is associate professor and associate department chair in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Minnesota’s College of Education and Human Development. He conducts, and teaches doctoral seminars focusing on, phenomenological research. In addition, Vagle teaches courses on qualitative research methodologies, as well as philosophies, theories, and teaching practices that inform the schooling of elementary students.

Currently, Vagle is using what he has termed post-intentional phenomenology to critically examine various ways in which issues related to social class take concrete (lived) shape in the curriculum and pedagogies of elementary education. He has published his work widely in journals such as the International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Qualitative Inquiry, Field Methods, and Curriculum Inquiry–and his book, Crafting Phenomenological Research was published by Left Coast Press in 2014.